Innovation

Impress Media Australia works with a range of innovative Australian companies and individuals. Please read the stories below for details.

A calendar depicting Australian birds from which are endangered by increasingly ferocious bushfires is helping to raise funds to support a volunteer brigade which battles these blazes near Darwin River.

Designed by bird photographer and ecotourism expert Denise Lawungkurr Goodfellow, the Birds of Australia’s Top End 2020 calendar contains pictures of birds including the Crimson Finch, the Partridge Pidgeon, the Varied Lorikeet, the Little Kingfisher and the Red-backed Fairy Wren.

Most disturbingly, the penultimate page of the calendar contains photographs of gamba grass - an African grass introduced to Australia as cattle feed - and a ferocious fire fuelled by this invasive grass. All profits raised from sales of the calendar will go to support the work of the Darwin River Volunteer Bushfire Brigade, of which Denise and her husband Michael are both members.

Denise Goodfellow has a long history of promoting environmentally sensitive tourism to the NT. This includes her role as a founding member of Ecotourism Australia, receiving nomination by Earthfoot for Condé Nast’s International Ecotourism Award in 2004 and winning the Individual Champion Award, Natural Resource Management, Northern Territory in 2016.

A stylishly renovated office building equipped with solar panels is available for exclusive lease in the thriving Adelaide suburb of Norwood. Located next to the historic Robin Hood Hotel, the circa-1900 villa has undergone a $100,000 refurbishment as commercial premises, providing comfortable and quiet offices, with prominent signage on Portrush Road.

313 Portrush Road Norwood 22As well as on-site parking, the location offers the benefit of its proximity to the bustling heart of Norwood Parade and across the road from the Robin Hood, with its courtyard bar, licensed restaurant and convenient catering.  The building is offered for lease through Munro Property Group

This attractive villa is at 313 Portrush Road, Norwood. Click here to see it on Google Maps.

Denise Goodfellow 2NT residents are calling for urgent action to fight a fire-prone grass introduced to Australia as cattle food that’s devastating native plants and animals in the Top End and threatening the lives of locals and tourists this Dry Season.

Gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) is a tall African grass that the Australian cattle industry has embraced for its ability to support many more cattle than native pasture and its tolerance of tropical seasons. Gamba grass is highly flammable, growing in clumps as tall as four metres with stems as thick as bamboo.

Australian eco-tourism expert and long-time NT resident Denise Goodfellow describes the gamba grass infestations of the Top End as “verging on the catastrophic”. "While the NT Government has put much effort into fighting gamba grass, we need to recognise that it’s more than a nuisance weed – it is a disaster waiting to happen,” she warns.

“I thought gamba grass was bad in the Darwin River area, but the Adelaide River/Batchelor infestation must be seen to be believed. What the hell is going to happen in the Adelaide River region come the late Dry? I’m beginning to think it suicidal to live in such areas. People - residents, tourists and firefighters - are at risk.  Firefighters are saying they can’t always defend landholders here because so many gamba-fuelled fires are uncontrollable, and that sooner or later people are going to die.”