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A stylishly renovated office building equipped with solar panels is available for exclusive lease in the thriving Adelaide suburb of Norwood. Located next to the historic Robin Hood Hotel, the circa-1900 villa has undergone a $100,000 refurbishment as commercial premises, providing comfortable and quiet offices, with prominent signage on Portrush Road.

313 Portrush Road Norwood 22As well as on-site parking, the location offers the benefit of its proximity to the bustling heart of Norwood Parade and across the road from the Robin Hood, with its courtyard bar, licensed restaurant and convenient catering.  The building is offered for lease through Munro Property Group

This attractive villa is at 313 Portrush Road, Norwood. Click here to see it on Google Maps.

Simon Hackett (right)) at his property, The Vale, in north-west TasmaniaSimon Hackett (right)) at his property, The Vale, in north-west TasmaniaAustralian energy storage company Redflow Limited (ASX: RFX) has secured an order to immediately supply 27 of its ZBM2 zinc-bromine flow batteries for a Tasmanian farm owned by Simon Hackett.

Mr Hackett - Redflow’s largest single shareholder - has designed an energy system to deliver energy independence for the 73-hectare property, The Vale (http://www.thevale.com.au), located in North West Tasmania. The Vale runs sheep and beef cattle, with ‘The Vale Lamb’ featuring on the menus of multiple hotels along the north-west Tasmanian coast. The farm, which is diversifying into additional forms of agriculture, is also exploring an expansion into eco-tourism operations.

The energy harvesting, storage and distribution system at The Vale will use an initial deployment of 27 ZBM2 batteries, storing as much as 270 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of energy, interfaced to a large fault-tolerant cluster of 12 x Victron Quattro 48/15000 inverter/chargers. The system will harvest renewable energy from a 100-kilowatt peak (kWp) ground-mounted array of photovoltaic (PV) solar panels, with scope for future expansion.

Albinism Fellowship members including AFA President Elizabeth Beales (right)Albinism Fellowship members including AFA President Elizabeth Beales (second from right)About 100 individuals and family members affected by albinism will gather in Adelaide this weekend for a national conference about the causes, challenges and achievements of this often-misunderstood genetic condition.

International and Australian speakers at the eighth national Albinism Conference will dispel common misconceptions about albinism which range from “all albinos have pink eyes” to the unlikelihood of an albino assassin as portrayed in The Da Vinci Code.

Albinism, a genetic condition caused by a lack of pigment in the skin, hair and eyes, is linked to pale skin, white hair and poor eyesight, often in the range of legal blindness. With an occurrence of one in 17,000, Australia has an estimated 1500 persons with albinism.

Albinism Fellowship of Australia President Elizabeth Beales said the truth about people with albinism was actually much more interesting than the ridiculous myths that abound. “Dan Brown’s novel, The Da Vinci Code, was just plain stupid – most people with albinism have very poor eyesight, which really limits your ability to succeed as an assassin,” she said.

Denise Goodfellow 2NT residents are calling for urgent action to fight a fire-prone grass introduced to Australia as cattle food that’s devastating native plants and animals in the Top End and threatening the lives of locals and tourists this Dry Season.

Gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) is a tall African grass that the Australian cattle industry has embraced for its ability to support many more cattle than native pasture and its tolerance of tropical seasons. Gamba grass is highly flammable, growing in clumps as tall as four metres with stems as thick as bamboo.

Australian eco-tourism expert and long-time NT resident Denise Goodfellow describes the gamba grass infestations of the Top End as “verging on the catastrophic”. "While the NT Government has put much effort into fighting gamba grass, we need to recognise that it’s more than a nuisance weed – it is a disaster waiting to happen,” she warns.

“I thought gamba grass was bad in the Darwin River area, but the Adelaide River/Batchelor infestation must be seen to be believed. What the hell is going to happen in the Adelaide River region come the late Dry? I’m beginning to think it suicidal to live in such areas. People - residents, tourists and firefighters - are at risk.  Firefighters are saying they can’t always defend landholders here because so many gamba-fuelled fires are uncontrollable, and that sooner or later people are going to die.”