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Michael and I left Darwin after midnight on March 20 for the USA.  First stop was Sydney and a wait of a few hours before we boarded a plane for Los Angeles.  This  leg of the flight, across the Pacific, took 13 hours.  It  didn?t seem that long, and time would have gone even faster had we more seat space- the man on Michael?s left was extremely large, and he forced the seat arm between them into Michael.  

Marty GauvinAustralian technology entrepreneur Marty Gauvin has left Hostworks, the company he founded 10 years ago, after successfully overseeing its acquisition by Broadcast Australia.

Although Marty intends to maintain a number of roles within not-for-profit organisations and fulfil his existing public speaking engagements, his immediate intention is to look at the available opportunities for starting a new business.

Marty said the move on from Hostworks was a logical progression in his professional development. “I’m confident I leave Hostworks in good hands, with a strong management team and an excellent track record in terms of customer care and support,” he said.

A Cisco Systems technology event in Adelaide this week is nearly 80 per cent subscribed as its South Australian customers and partners seek a peek at its latest products.

Cisco Technology Solutions 2009 is a one-day show touring major capital cities across Australia and New Zealand. At the event, Cisco will demonstrate how its business strategies and leading-edge technologies are helping organisations to virtualise, mobilise and optimise resources, people and information assets for a sustained business advantage.

Greg BirchCut costs not customers warns corporate gift expert

Corporate gifts specialist Office Range warns that many businesses risk cutting off communication with customers in their rush to cut costs in the economic downturn.

Office Range general manager Greg Birch said an unfortunately ‘knee jerk’ reaction to tougher times is to reduce the marketing budget. “Marketing simply means ‘to retain existing or prospect new customers’ with regards to your products or services,” he said.

“In tough times, it’s wise to look at what is really needed and what you can do without for a while - “trim the fat” so to speak. The problem is if you cut out a fundamental part of your company such as marketing, both new and existing customers may lose touch with you or even think you’ve gone out of business.

“The net result is an accelerating decline in revenues which makes the problem even worse."