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Redflow CEO Simon HackettRedflow CEO Simon Hackett

Australian energy storage specialist Redflow Limited has welcomed news that Victron Energy’s MultiGrid 48/3000 battery inverter is now approved for connection to the Australian electricity grid.

The MultiGrid 48/3000 is a version of Victron’s popular MultiPlus 48/3000 inverter enhanced to meet the AS/NZS4777.2:2015 standard for grid connection of energy systems via battery inverters. 

ASX-listed Redflow (ASX:RFX) produces Australia’s unique ZCell zinc-bromine flow battery which works with a range of battery inverters including Victron, Selectronic, Redback and GoodWe.

Redflow CEO Simon Hackett said the availability of the Victron MultiGrid 48/3000 inverter for grid-connected battery systems was good news for consumers. “Victron inverters are easy to configure, they work beautifully with ZCell and they are competitively priced,” he said.

Now available in Australia and New Zealand, new add-on for Centrify Identity Services Platform uses machine learning to spot and block suspicious access attempts

Centrify Chief Product Officer Bill ManCentrify Chief Product Officer Bill ManCentrify, the leader in securing hybrid enterprises through the power of identity services, has launched its new Analytics Service, which uses machine learning to assess and respond to risk based on user behaviour. 

Based on its analysis of constantly-evolving user behaviour patterns, the Centrify Analytics Service assigns a risk score, and enforces an appropriate decision - determining whether the user’s access is granted, requires step-up authentication, or is blocked entirely.

The Centrify Analytics Service is now available in Australia and New Zealand as an add-on to Centrify Identity Service and Centrify Privilege Service.

Centrify chief product officer Bill Mann said behaviour-based scoring gave low-risk users a frictionless experience, easing access and improving productivity, while maintaining high security. “By tailoring security policy to each individual’s behaviour and automatically flagging risky behaviour, we’re helping IT professionals minimise the risk of being breached — with immediate visibility into account risk, without poring over millions of log files and massive amounts of historical data,” he said.

Centrify-commissioned Forrester study reveals organisations spend US$75B on security, yet 83 per cent are at high risk, and being breached at an alarming rate

Centrify CEO Tom KempCentrify CEO Tom KempCentrify, the leader in securing hybrid enterprises through the power of identity services, commissioned a new Forrester study that reveals the enterprise security industry is failing, with organisations being breached at an alarming rate.

The study found an astonishing two-thirds of organisations experienced an average of five or more security breaches in the past two years, and hackers compromised more than one billion identities in 2016 alone.

“Cybersecurity breaches are causing more havoc and affecting more industries than ever before,” said Tom Kemp, CEO of Centrify. “Despite over US$75 billion spent on cybersecurity in 2016, the products and services from major security companies have failed to stop breaches from occurring, and in fact, the problem is getting worse. This clearly indicates that traditional approaches are flat out not working in this age of access.”

Andrew KempsterRedflow Global Sales Director Andrew KempsterAustralian energy storage specialist Redflow Ltd is successfully selling its batteries in Asian countries where telecommunications have leap-frogged copper lines into wireless telephony and broadband.

Many Asian nations have jumped straight to cellular network-based phone and Internet services because they lack the copper-based communication networks that exist in countries like Australia.

As a result, Redflow is pursuing a massive potential demand in Asia for its zinc-bromine flow batteries to power mobile telecommunication towers located in areas without reliable electricity supplies.

ASX-listed Redflow, which has offices in Brisbane and Adelaide, where CEO Simon Hackett is based, is an energy storage specialist that has developed the world’s smallest zinc-bromine flow batteries (learn more at www.redflow.com).

Redflow’s 48-volt 10 kilowatt hour (kWh) flow batteries solve many of the problems that impact the region’s telecommunications providers, including the ability to operate in hot conditions without active cooling; 100 per cent depth of discharge on a daily basis; long-term storage at any state of charge, from empty to full, without damaging the battery; and construction materials with minimal resale value, making them less attractive to thieves.

Redflow’s Global Sales Director Andrew Kempster, who is based in Adelaide, said growth in Asia was based on solid relationships. “We currently support integration partners in India, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand and the Philippines who have sold small systems so telecommunication companies can evaluate our batteries in the field,” he said.